Thursday, July 13, 2017

Belleville NJ - wasting citizens' tax money

Belleville, NJ:
How Our Tax Money Is Wasted in the Municipal Court System
An experience with the municipal court system in Belleville New Jersey shows how time and tax money is wasted, and how a town mistreats its senior citizens
 
My father had always kept his car parked on the street in front of his house in Belleville, NJ. Not in front of anyone else's house, mind you. His second car was kept in the garage. When I visited recently I noticed the old car in front of the house was gone. I asked him what happened to it, and being 82 years old, he said to me, “They towed it away, they said I donated it." Of course, this is not what happened. Among some papers on his desk I found a parking ticket that read "abandoned motor vehicle."

I called the chief of police who said neighbors had complained that the car was parked in front of the house (his house, not theirs, I remind you. I guess some people have nothing better to do than look out their windows and get into other people's business). Then he said, "Well, the town has an ordinance that says a car can't be parked in the same spot for 48 hours." So I guess the cops in Belleville have too much time on their hands, being that they spent their time writing parking tickets to senior citizens. No wonder property taxes are so high in New Jersey. Too many cops doing nothing.

The chief said he was sent written warnings, about not moving the car. Well that isn't true. They sent nothing, because I went through my father's mail every day, and they never sent any warnings. Then the chief said, just go to court, and they'll dismiss the ticket. (Okay...but then why did you write it in the first place?)

So I went to the impound lot and had the car hauled away for $300, which I had to give to the impound lot owners, for their towing fee. The car was still running, but since my mother wasn't driving anymore, there was no need for my father to keep and maintain two cars. Then I scheduled a court date to contest the $260 abandoned motor vehicle ticket.

So I go to the municipal court in Belleville and meet with the prosecutor, who gives me a silly song and dance about how he can't recommend dismissing the ticket, blah, blah, blah. Nevermind that my father lived in Belleville, his entire life as a law abiding citizen, and paid thousands of dollars in property taxes during the past 50 years. Nevermind that there was no written warnings about the car, and nevermind that he's 82 and probably didn't comprehend that there was some obscure ordinance about not leaving a car in the same spot for longer than 48 hours. (By the way, there were no marks on the tires when I found it at the impound lot, so the cops had no proof that the car was parked there for a certain amount of time).

Finally I stood up and said to the wormy prosecutor, "Forget it, I'm just going to pay the ticket and go to the media with my story, about how Belleville treats their senior citizens." Of course, now the prosecutor says, "Don't do that, we'll call the cop and try to reach a settlement."

So we go in front of the municipal court judge, a guy named Zinna, to ask for a new date, and this judge rambles on about nonsense...where's your father, I don't know if we can do this, blah, blah, blah. This from a guy, like all municipal court judges in New Jersey, has his own private law practice but moonlights on the side as a judge in order to get into the state pension system and milk the taxpayers for money. Finally he relents and we have a new court date, three weeks later.

So I go to court on the new date - and there's a new prosecutor! I start to explain the situation, and after fifteen seconds he cuts me off with "I'm just going to ask the judge to dismiss this." He hustles into the courtroom, I follow him, and he asks the judge to dismiss the ticket. I see that it's the same judge, Zinna, from three weeks prior, the one who grumbled and groaned about setting a new date for a conference. Zinna says, "This is a minor issue. Case dismissed."

Wouldn't it have made more sense just to dismiss the ticket the first time? Wouldn't have made more sense for the cops to ask my father if there was anyone helping with things, and could you give them this warning letter about the car parked in front of the house? No. Instead these fools waste my time and tax money with their silly shenanigans. Political nonsense. Right wingers rage about too much government at the federal level, when the reality is there's too much government at the local level. Anyone who writes a parking ticket to senior citizen for a car parked in front of his own house ought to be ashamed of himself. All the problems in the world, and this is what cops, prosecutors, and judges are spending their time and our tax money on? It's a disgrace.

Monday, July 10, 2017

The best Right Fielders in Major League Baseball history

The best Right Fielders in Major League Baseball history
 
 
10) Dwight Evans – Owner of one of the strongest throwing arms among outfielders in baseball history, eight time Gold Glove winner and three time All Star Evans saved 71 runs while playing 2,092 games in right field, mainly with the Red Sox for 20 seasons from 1972-1991. His fielding average of .987 is higher than the league average of .978 for right fielders during that time period. “Dewey” batted .272 with 385 home runs and 1,384 RBI’s.

 
9) Ichiro Suzuki Playing 1,954 games in right field in 17 years from 2001-2017, mainly with the Mariners, “Wizard” has saved 123 runs defensively and his .991 fielding percentage is higher than the league average of .983. Winner of 10 Gold Gloves and a 10 time All Star, Suzuki has batted .312 with 3,034 hits and 508 stolen bases.

 
8) Dave Winfield - A 12 time All Star and winner of five Gold Gloves, Winfield played 1,882 games in right for 22 years from 1973-1995, for the Yankees, Padres, Angels, Blue Jays, and Twins. His .984 fielding percentage was above the league average of .977. Winfield hit .283 with 465 home runs, 1,833 RBI’s, and 223 stolen bases.

 
7) Reggie Jackson - “Mr. October” played 1,942 games in right field for 21 years from 1967-1987, twice leading AL outfielders in assists. The 1973 AL MVP and 14 time All Star batted .262 with 563 home runs, 1,702 RBI’s, and 228 stolen bases for the A’s, Yankees, Angels, and Orioles. In 27 World Series games Jackson hit .357 with 10 homers and 24 RBI’s.

 
6) Tony Gwynn – A 15 time All Star Gwynn led the NL in batting average for eight of his 20 years with the Padres from 1982-2001. “Captain Video” hit .338 with a .388 on base percentage, 3,141 hits, and 319 stolen bases. He won five Gold Gloves while playing 2,144 games in right field.
 

5) Roberto Clemente – “The Great One” was named to 15 All Star teams, won 12 Gold Gloves, and was selected as the 1966 NL MVP. Clemente played 2,305 games in right for the Pirates for 18 years from 1955-1972, and is credited with saving 205 runs defensively. He batted .317 with 3,000 hits, 240 homers, and 1,305 RBI’s.

 
4) Al Kaline – An 18 time All Star and winner of 10 Gold Gloves, “Mr. Tiger” played 2,031 games in right field for Detroit for 22 seasons from 1953-1974. Kaline batted .297 with 399 home runs, 1,582 RBI’s, and 3,007 hits. His .985 fielding percentage was higher than the league average of .978 and he is credited with saving 155 runs defensively.

 
3) Paul Waner – “Big Poison” played 2,250 games in right field for 20 seasons from 1926-1945, primarily with the Pirates. Waner batted .333 with a .404 on base percentage, 605 doubles, 191 triples, and 3,152 hits. He was named the 1927 NL MVP.

 
2) Mel Ott – A 12 time All Star, “Master Melvin” played 2,161 games in right field during 22 seasons from 1926-1947, all with the New York Giants.  Ott hit .304 with 511 home runs, 1,860 RBI’s, with a .414 on base percentage and .533 slugging percentage. His fielding percentage of .980 was higher than the league average of .971 for right fielders during that time period.

 
1) Hank Aaron – “Hammerin’ Hank” played 2,174 games in right, mainly with the Braves, during 23 seasons from 1954-1975. His .980 fielding percentage was higher than the league average of .976 and he is credited with saving 98 runs as a right fielder. Aaron batted .305 with 755 homers, 2,297 RBI’s, 240 stolen bases, and a .555 slugging percentage. He was selected to 25 All Star teams, won three Gold Gloves, and was named the 1957 NL MVP.

Thursday, July 6, 2017

The best Center Fielders in Major League Baseball history

The best Center Fielders in Major League Baseball history


10) Richie Ashburn – A six time All Star, “Put Put” played 1,948 games in center field for 15 seasons from 1948-1962, mainly with the Phillies. Ashburn batted .308 with a .396 on base percentage and 234 stolen bases, and is credited with saving 39 runs defensively.

9) Jim Edmonds – “Jimmy Baseball” won eight Gold Gloves while playing 1,768 games in center field in 17 seasons from 1993-2010, primarily with the Angels and Cardinals. A four time All Star, Edmonds batted .284 with 393 homers and 1,199 RBI’s. He is credited with saving 80 runs on defense.

8) Andruw Jones – A five time All Star and winner of 10 Gold Gloves, “The Curacao Kid” played 1,724 games in centerfield and is credited with saving an impressive 220 runs at the position. Jones’ .992 fielding percentage is higher than the league average of .987 for the time of his career, 17 seasons from 1996-2012, mainly with the Braves. He batted .254 with 434 home runs and 1,289 RBI’s.

7) Duke Snider – The “Duke of Flatbush” played 1,589 games in center field for the Dodgers in 18 years from 1947-1964. The eight time All Star had a fielding percentage of .985, higher than the league average of .982, and batted .295 with 407 home runs, 1,333 RBI’s, and a .380 on base percentage.

6) Ken Griffey Jr. -  Winner of 10 Gold Gloves and a 13 time All Star, “Junior” played 2,145 games in center for the Mariners and Reds. For 22 years from 1989-2010 Griffey batted. 284 with 630 home runs and 1,836 RBI’s. He was named the 1997 American League MVP.

5) Mickey Mantle -  “The Commerce Comet” played 1,742 games in centerfield for the Yankees for 18 seasons from 1951-1968.  Mantle hit .298 with 536 homers, 1,509 RBI’s, a .421 on base percentage, and .557 slugging percentage. He was named to 20 All Star teams (two were played some years), won the AL MVP three times, and was awarded one Gold Glove.

4) Joe DiMaggio – A 13 time All Star and winner of the AL MVP award in 1939, 1941, and 1947, “Joltin’ Joe” played 1,634 games in centerfield for the Yankees, leading AL centerfielders in assists for three seasons. DiMaggio batted .325 with 361 home runs, 1,537 RBI’s, a .398 on base percentage and a .579 slugging percentage in 13 seasons from 1936-1951.

3) Tris Speaker – The 1912 AL MVP played 2,088 games in centerfield for 22 seasons from 1907-1940, primarily with the Indians and Red Sox. “The Grey Eagle” had a fielding percentage of .972, higher than the league average of .965, and led AL centerfielders eight years in double plays, seven years in assists, and four years in range factor. Speaker batted .345 with 3,514 hits, 1,531 RBI’s, 436 stolen bases, a .428 on base percentage, and a .500 slugging percentage. He is Major League baseball’s all time leader in doubles with 792.

2) Ty Cobb - Playing 1,697 games in center for 24 years from 1905-1928, mainly with the Tigers, Cobb won the AL MVP in 1911 and led AL centerfielders twice in fielding percentage and three times in double plays. “The Georgia Peach” is the majors’ all time leader in career batting average with a mark of .366. He had an on base percentage of .433, slugging percentage of .521, 4,189 hits, 1,944 RBI’s, and 897 stolen bases.

1) Willie Mays – A 24 time All Star and winner of the 1954 and 1965 NL MVP, the “Say Hey Kid” played 2,829 games in centerfield in 22 seasons from 1951-1973, primarily with the Giants. Mays won 12 Gold Gloves and is credited with saving an impressive 176 runs defensively in centerfield. He batted .302 with a .384 on base percentage, .557 slugging percentage, 660 home runs, 1,903 RBI’s, and 338 stolen bases.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

The best Left Fielders in Major League Baseball history

The best Left Fielders in Major League Baseball history
 

10) Ralph Kiner – A six time All Star, Kiner played 1,307 games in left field in 10 seasons from 1946-1955, primarily with the Pirates. He batted .279 with a .398 on base percentage, 369 homers and 1,015 RBI’s.

9) Ed Delahanty – “Big Ed” played 1,346 games in left for 16 seasons from 1888-1903, mainly with the Phillies. He had a career batting average of .346 with a .411 on base percentage, .505 slugging percentage, and 455 stolen bases.

8) Jim Rice – An eight time All Star and the 1978 AL MVP, Rice played 1,503 games in left field for the Red Sox for 15 years from 1974-1989. He batted .298 with 382 home runs and 1,451 RBI’s.

7) Billy Williams – “Sweet Swingin’” played 1,738 games in left during 17 seasons with the Cubs from 1959-1976. A six time All Star, Williams hit .290 with 426 home runs and 1,475 RBI’s.

6) Goose Goslin – Playing 1,948 games in left field for 18 seasons from 1921-1938, mainly with the Washington Senators, Hall of Famer Goslin batted .316 with a .387 on base percentage, 248 home runs, 1,612 RBI’s, and 176 stolen bases.

5) Al Simmons – “Bucketfoot Al” played 1,372 games in left for seven teams, mostly with the A’s, for 20 years from 1924-1944. A three time All Star, he also played centerfield. Simmons hit .334 with 307 home runs and 1,828 RBI’s.

4) Lou Brock – “The Rocket” spent 19 seasons with the Cubs and Cardinals from 1961-1979. Playing 2,161 games in left field Brock amassed 3,043 hits while batting .293. A six time All Star, he is second in baseball history with 938 stolen bases.

3) Rickey Henderson – “Man of Steal” played 2,421 games in left in 25 years for nine different teams, 14 seasons with the A’s, from 1979-2003. Henderson holds the MLB stolen base record with 1,406; he batted .279 with a .401 on base percentage, 3,055 hits, 2,295 runs scored, and 2,190 walks. A ten time All Star selection and winner of the 1990 AL MVP, he won one Gold Glove and is credited with saving 58 runs in left field.

2) Carl Yastrzemski – An 18 time All Star in 22 years from 1961-1983 for the Red Sox, “Yaz” won seven Gold Gloves and is credited with saving 134 runs defensively while playing 1,912 games in left field.  The 1967 AL MVP  totaled 3,419 hits while batting .285 with a .379 on base percentage, 452 home runs, 1,844 RBI’s, and 168 stolen bases.

1) Ted Williams – In 19 seasons from 1939-1960 “The Splendid Splinter” had a career batting average of .344, on base percentage of .482, slugging percentage of .634, 521 home runs, 1,839 RBI’s, and 2,021 walks.  Williams played 1,982 games in left field for the Red Sox, was a 19 time All Star, and won the AL MVP in 1946 and 1949.

Monday, July 3, 2017

The best Third Basemen in Major League Baseball history

The best Third Basemen in Major League Baseball history

10) Pie Traynor – A two time All Star, Traynor played 1,863 games in 18 years at third for the Pirates from 1920-1937. He had a career batting average of .320, drove in 1,273 runs and stole 158 bases. His .947 fielding percentage equaled the league average for that time period.

9) Graig Nettles – In 21 seasons from 1968-1988 “Puff” played 2,412 games at third base mainly for the Yankees, Indians, Twins, and Padres. A six time All Star and two time Gold Glove winner his fielding percentage of .961 was higher than the league average of .952, and he saved 134 runs at the hot corner. Nettles batted .248 with 390 home runs, and 1,314 RBI’s.

8) Scott Rolen - From 1996-2012 Rolen played 2,023 games at third base for the Phillies, Cardinals, Blue Jays, and Reds. A seven time All Star and eight time Gold Glove winner, his fielding percentage of .968 was higher than the league average of .954, and he saved 150 runs at third base. Rolen had a career batting average of .281, with 316 home runs, 1,287 RBI’s and 118 stolen bases.

7) Ron Santo – A five time Gold Glove winner and nine time All Star, Santo played 2,130 games at third for the Cubs in 15 seasons from 1960-1974. He had a .954 fielding percentage, with the league average being .948, and saved 27 runs in his career. Santo had a .277 batting average, 342 home runs, and 1,331 RBI’s.

6) Chipper Jones – Winner of the 1999 National League MVP award Jones played 1,992 games at third base for the Braves in 19 seasons from 1993-2012. He also played the outfield. An eight time All Star, Jones batted .303, with a .401 on base percentage, 468 home runs, 1,623 RBI’s, and 150 stolen bases. His .954 fielding percentage was close to the league average of .953.

5) Wade Boggs – “Chicken Man” played 2,215 games in 18 seasons at third base from 1982-1999 for the Red Sox, Yankees and Rays, and was selected to 12 All Star teams. He won two Gold Gloves, saved 95 runs, and his fielding percentage of .962 was higher than the .951 league average.  Boggs batted .328 with a .415 on base percentage in his career, and won five American League batting titles.

4) Eddie Mathews – “Cap’n Eddie” was a 12 time All Star during 17 seasons, mainly with the Milwaukee Braves. He batted .271 with a .376 on base percentage, .509 slugging percentage, 512 home runs, and 1,453 RBI’s. Mathews played 2,181 games at third base, is credited with saving 40 runs defensively, and his .956 fielding percentage was higher than the league average of .950.

3) George Brett – “Mullet” was named to 13 All Star teams while playing 1,692 games at third in 21 seasons from 1973-1993 for the Royals. Brett collected 3,154 hits while batting .305 with 317 home runs, 1,596 RBI’s and 201 stolen bases. He won the 1980 AL MVP and a Gold Glove in 1985, and is credited with saving 54 runs on defense in his career.

2) Brooks Robinson – Perhaps the best defensive baseball player of all time, winning 16 Gold Gloves and credited with saving an amazing 293 runs in 2,870 games at third base for the Orioles in 23 seasons from 1955-1977, the “Human Vacuum Cleaner” was named to 18 All Star teams. Robinson’s fielding percentage of .971 was higher than the league average of .953 for third basemen. He batted .267 with 268 home runs and 1,357 RBI’s in his career, and was named the American League MVP in 1964.

1) Mike Schmidt – A 12 time All Star and 3 time National League MVP, “Schmitty” played 2,212 games at third base for the Phillies in 18 years for the Phillies from 1972-1989. Schmidt hit .267 with a .380 on base percentage, 548 home runs, 1,595 RBI’s, and 174 stolen bases. He won 10 Gold Gloves; his .955 fielding percentage is higher than the league average of .949, and he saved 129 runs defensively during his career.

Thursday, June 29, 2017

The 10 best Shortstops in Major League Baseball history

The 10 best Shortstops in Major League Baseball history
 
10) Phil Rizzuto – Winner of the 1950 American League MVP award and a five time All Star, “Scooter” played 1,647 games in 13 seasons for the Yankees in the 1940’s and 1950’s, contributing to 7 World Championship teams.  He had a fielding average of .968, higher than the league average of .959. Rizzuto had a career batting average of .273 with an on-base percentage of .351 and 149 stolen bases.

9) Robin Yount – In a twenty year career from 1974 -1993 “The Kid” played 1,479 games at shortstop for the Milwaukee Brewers with a .964 fielding percentage, equal to the league average during that time. Winner of a  a Gold Glove in 1982, as well as the AL MVP in 1982 and 1989, he batted .285 with 3,142 hits, 251 home runs, 1,406 RBI’s, and 271 stolen bases. A three time All Star, Yount played centerfield for the latter half of his career.

8) Pee Wee Reese – In sixteen seasons in the 1940’s and 1950’s “The Little Colonel” played 2,014 games at shortstop for the Dodgers and was named to 10 All Star teams. His fielding average was .962, higher than the league average of .958, and his career totals include .269 batting average with a .366 on base percentage and 232 stolen bases.

7) Barry Larkin – Winner of the 1995 NL MVP award, Larkin was a 12 time All Star in a 19 year career and 2,085 games with the Reds, from 1986-2004. His .975 fielding percentage was above the league average of .968, and he led the league in range factor per game for three seasons. Larkin had a career batting average of .295, an on base percentage of .371, and 379 stolen bases.

6) Luke Appling – In 20 years from 1930-1950 “Luscious Luke” played 2,218 games at shortstop for the White Sox, and was named to seven All Star teams. He had a career batting average of .319 with an on base percentage of .399. Appling led American League shortstops in range factor per game for three seasons.

5) Luis Aparicio – “Little Louie” played 2,599 games at shortstop in 18 years from 1956 to 1973 for the White Sox, Orioles, and Red Sox. He saved 149 runs in his career, had a fielding percentage of .972, higher than the league average of .963, won 9 Gold Gloves, and was named to 10 All Star teams. Aparicio batted .262 with 506 stolen bases in his career.

4) Derek Jeter – “Captain Clutch” played 2,674 games at shortstop for 20 seasons from 1995-2014 for the Yankees, and was named to 14 All Star teams. He won five Gold Gloves and his .976 fielding percentage was higher than the league average of .972. Jeter finished his career with a .310 batting average, .377 on base percentage, 3,465 hits, 1,923 runs scored, 358 stolen bases, 260 home runs, and 1,311 RBI’s.

3) Honus Wagner – In 21 years from 1897-1917, “The Flying Dutchman” played 1,887 games at shortstop for the Pirates. He led the league in fielding percentage four seasons, with his .940 career mark higher than the league average of .927. He also played the outfield and the three other infield positions.  Wagner batted .328 with a .391 on base percentage, 3,420 hits, 1,739 runs scored, 723 stolen bases, and 1,732 RBI’s.

2) Cal Ripken Jr. – The “Iron Man,” was a 19 time All Star, won two Gold Gloves, and winner of the AL MVP in 1983 and 1991. He played 2,302 games at shortstop in a 21 year career from 1981-2001 for the Orioles. His fielding percentage of .979 was higher than the league average of .969, and he is crediting with saving 176 runs at shortstop. Ripken batted .276 with 431 home runs and 1,695 RBI’s.

1) Ozzie Smith – Playing 2,511 games at shortstop in 19 years from 1978-1996 for the Padres and Cardinals, “The Wizard of Oz” saved an astounding 239 runs during his career. He is baseball’s all-time leader, at any position, in career Defensive Wins-Above-Replacement with 43.4. A 13 time Gold Glove winner, his fielding percentage of .978 was higher than the league average of .966. Named to 15 All Star teams, Smith batted .262 with 580 stolen bases.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

The 10 best Second Basemen in Major League Baseball history


Second Basemen

10) Tony Lazzeri – Playing in 1,760 games from 1926-1939, primarily for the Yankees, “Poosh’em Up Tony” batted .292, with 178 home runs, 1,194 RBI’s, 148 stolen bases, and a .380 on base percentage.

9) Craig Biggio – From 1988-2007 Biggio played 1,989 games at second base for the Astros; he also played catcher and centerfield. His career totals included a .281 batting average, 3,060 hits, 291 homers, 1,175 RBI’s, 414 stolen bases, and a .363 on base percentage. His .984 fielding percentage was higher than the league average of .982 for secondbasemen; he won four Gold Gloves and was named to seven All Star teams.

8) Bill Mazeroski – From 1956-1972, “Maz” played in 2,163 games for the Pirates and had a fielding average of .983, higher than the league average of .976 at the time. Defensively he saved 148 runs in his career and won eight Gold Gloves. Named to seven All Star teams, Mazeroski had a career batting average of .260.

7) Ryne Sandberg – A ten time All Star and winner of the 1984 National League MVP, “Ryno” played in 2,164 games from 1981-1997, all but thirteen with the Cubs. He batted .285 with 282 home runs, 1,061 RBI’s, and 344 stolen bases. Sandberg’s fielding average of .989 was higher than the league average of .981, and he saved 57 runs in his career, winning nine Gold Gloves.

6) Joe Morgan – Morgan played 2,527 games at second base from 1962-1984, primarily for the Astros and Reds.  He batted .271, with a .392 on base percentage, 268 home runs, 1,133 RBI’s, 689 stolen bases, and a .981 fielding percentage, compared to the league average of .977. Morgan was a ten time All Star, won five Gold Gloves, and was named the National League MVP in 1975 and 1976.

5) Frankie Frisch - Playing in 2,311 games from 1919-1937 for the Cardinals and Giants, “The Fordham Flash” had a career batting average of .316, with 2,880 hits and 419 stolen bases. His fielding average of .974 was higher than the league average of .965. Frisch was selected as the 1931 National League MVP.

4) Charlie Gehringer – “The Mechanical Man” played in 2,323 games for the Tigers from 1924-1942, batting .320 with 2,839 hits, 184 home runs, 1,427 RBI’s, 181 stolen bases, and a .404 on base percentage. Gehringer’s .976 fielding percentage was higher than the league average of .968; he was named to six All Star teams and won the 1937 American League MVP.

3) Rogers Hornsby – From 1915-1937 “Rajah” played 1,561 games at second base, mainly with St. Louis. He also played shortstop, third base, and the outfield. His career numbers include a .358 batting average, .434 on base percentage, 2,930 hits, 301 home runs, and 1,584 RBI’s. He won the Triple Crown in 1922 and 1925, and the National League MVP in 1925 and 1929.

2) Nap Lajoie – Playing for Cleveland and Philadelphia from 1896-1916, Lajoie spent 2,035 games at second base; he also played first base, shortstop, third base, and the outfield. He had a .963 fielding percentage, compared with the league average of .949 for secondbasemen. His batting numbers include 3,243 hits, 1,599 RBI’s, 380 stolen bases, a .338 batting average, and a .380 on base percentage.

1) Eddie Collins – The American League MVP in 1914, “Cocky” played in 2,650 games at second base for the White Sox and Philadelphia A’s from 1906-1930. Collins amassed 3,315 hits, 1,300 RBI’s, 741 stolen bases, a .333 batting average, and .424 on base percentage. His .970 fielding percentage was higher than the league average of .958.